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Changes to Works in Date Order

While the majority of Fleetwood‐Walker's paintings now reside in private hands, some, predominantly the large figurative works of the 1930s, are held in public collections both in the UK and abroad. 

Below is a selection of these works; more will be added in the future.


Washerwomen, c.1920s
The Interval, 1927
A Breton Peasant, 1928
Alderman James, c. 1928
The Bane, 1931
The Family, 1932
R H Butler and Family, 1932
Amity, 1933
Family at Polperro, 1934-36
The Hat, 1934-6
Elizabeth, 1936
Three Boys, 1937
John Ball and the Peasants' Rising of 1381, 1938
Trug with Dog Daisies, 1930s
Still Life with Pyrethrums, 1930s
Joan, 1930s
Auntie, 1946
Children, 1947
In the Dordogne, 1947
Miss Bryan, 1949
Head of a Girl
Seated Boy, 1940s
Drawings of a Nude, 1940s
Joan Woollard, c.1950
Douglas Gresham Esq., 1950
Dr. Edward Bramley, 1950
Louise, 1951
Caroline, 1953
Thomas Ferrers (1887 - 1970), formerly known as Thomas Walker, 1952/3
Lucy, 1953
Julie, No. 2, 1954
Alderman H.B.W. Cresswell, 1954
Professor Thomas Bodkin, 1955
Juanita, c. 1958
The Armchair, 1960
Study of the head of a woman with short hair - Christine c.1961


Washerwomen
c.1920s
Oil on Board
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery

Washerwomen, 1920s This work is undated, but may have been painted early in Fleetwood‐Walker's career while on holiday in France. The drawings collection has a number of figure studies showing men and women going about their daily business for examples see drawing references 053 and 169 although none relate directly to this oil.

Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January 7th to July 7th 2007


 
 
 

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© All Rights Reserved

 

The Interval
1927
Watercolour, 7½" x 10½" (19.1 x 26.7 cm)
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
 

The Interval, 1927

This charming watercolour shows a young ballet dancer, resting during a performance, her legs and billowing dress reflected in the studio mirror behind her. While initially it appears unlike anything else painted by Fleetwood‐Walker, there are recurring themes - compare the bare arms, slender fingers and floating skirts with the 1920s portrait of the artist's first wife, Repose, the young girl, also possibly a dancer in The Mirror and drawing 465. The overall palette is subtle, but the quiet reverie of the scene is off-set by the dancer's black hair and red lips, and the way in which, like the girl in Amity, this young woman looks self-assuredly out at the viewer.

© All Rights Reserved
Repose, 1925 The Mirror, 1927 Study of a young woman in a billowing dress (date unknown),
drawing 465

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A Breton Peasant
1928
Oil on Panel, 14" x 12" (35.7 x 30.5 cm)
The Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry
 

A Breton Peasant, 1928
© All Rights Reserved
Fleetwood‐Walker's early style is usually thought of in terms of the distinctive nudes and group paintings of the 1930s, for example The Bane or The Family at Polperro. However, it is clear that works executed in the 1920s reveal a decidedly painterly touch that he was to revisit in his later years.

While there are no specific drawings in the collection relating to the portrait of the Breton woman, the white houses certainly appear in various early works, such as A Village Madonna (1928), The Family, 1924 or Study of a House and Figures Reflected in Water, while in subject matter the painting compares with Breton Girl in Yellow Dress.

The Coventry & Warwickshire Society of Artists presented the painting to the Herbert Art Gallery in 1929. Fleetwood‐Walker was vice-president of the CWSA from 1927.


 

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Alderman James
c. 1928
Oil on Canvas, 40¼" x 30" (102.0 x 76.5 cm)
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
 

Alderman James, c. 1928
© All Rights Reserved

Alderman Alfred Henry James served two terms in office as Lord Mayor of Birmingham between 1926-28. Although the majority of Fleetwood‐Walker's civic portraits were painted later in his career, this portrait appears stylistically more in keeping with his earlier more decorative works, see, for example, the portrait of Mr Floyd , painted in 1930.

The painting is on loan to Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery from a private collection.

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The Bane
1931
Oil on Canvas, 45" x 38" (114.3 x 96.5 cm)
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
 

The Bane, 1931
© All Rights Reserved

During the 1930s Fleetwood‐Walker painted a series of nudes in the classical tradition. Of these, Sea-Born Thetis, The Model's Throne and this work all depict lone women and appear to allude to literary or archaic symbolism. The title, The Bane is associated with death, destruction or ruin, while the young woman holds a foxglove, itself a highly poisonous plant. In his exhibition catalogue, The Birmingham School, 1990, Stephen Wildman described the painting '....as typical of the sharp, well-balanced design in his oils of the 1930s....'.

Irrespective of any underlying meaning or message, these nudes were appreciated at the time for their sensuous beauty; for a while this painting was on loan to HMS Birmingham where it was displayed in the Officer's mess and no doubt viewed as a welcome diversion.


Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1932, number 661 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 81
Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January 7th to July 7th 2007
Exhibited Birmingham Museum in The Art of Birmingham 1890-1939, October 2007 to February 2008

See related drawings in the collection

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The Family 1932
1932
Oil on Canvas, 39½" x 36¼" (100.5 x 92.0 cm)
The Potteries Museum and Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent
 

The Family 1932
© All Rights Reserved

The artist's first wife, Mickey, and two sons, Colin and Guy are the central features of this painting of his family, and while Fleetwood‐Walker himself is a somewhat shadowy figure in the background, his presence is almost like a guardian angel. The family are on a summer's picnic in an idealised landscape, possibly in Cornwall where the whole family went with students from the Birmingham School of Art on sketching tours.

The bright colours and 'props' such as the checked blanket and basket motif are similar to those seen in Amity.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1932, no. 29
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 79

Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January 7th to July 7th 2007

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R H Butler and Family
1932
Oil on Canvas, 50" x 60¼" (127.0 x 153.0 cm)
Wolverhampton Art Gallery
 

R H Butler and Family, 1932
© All Rights Reserved


This portrait is of Robert H Butler, the director of Mitchells and Butlers brewery, together with his wife and young family. Unlike many of the portraits of civic figures and grandees of industry painted by the artist in the 1940s and 50s, this painting is in similar vein to the earlier group portraits of his own family with the Butlers portrayed in an informal setting, seated in a garden amid trees and sunshine.

The detail shows the quality of the brush strokes - in places so light that the canvas beneath is clearly visible.


Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1935, no. 105
Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January 7th to July 7th 2007

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R H Butler detail RH Butler and Family
Detail
© All Rights Reserved

Amity
1933
Oil on Canvas, 40" x 37¼" (101.3 x 94.7 cm)
The Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool
 

Amity, 1933
© All Rights Reserved
Although seemingly an informal picture depicting, maybe, two young lovers enjoying a picnic on a sunny day in the country, the painting exudes an air of menace. The whole canvas is filled by the circular composition that should in theory bring the couple together, but the contrapposto of the young woman's body separates her from her companion.

Tim Wilcox, in his catalogue, A Day in the Sun, describes the relationship between the sitters, "The image of the happy courting couple receives an unexpected twist in this painting, as the girl, provocatively toying with a daisy, seems to make herself available to anyone but the boy she is with".

Despite the title of the painting, 'Amity', meaning friendship or harmony, according to Peggy, the artist's second wife, the two models, Jeffrey and Nella, were in fact barely on speaking terms!

On permanent exhibition at The Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1933, no. 138
Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January to July 2007
Exhibited The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, in The 1930s: The Making of "the New Man", June to September 2008

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  Amity, 1933

 
Amity

Detail

 
Amity
Watercolour
Wolverhampton Art Gallery

© All Rights Reserved

This watercolour typically has more muted, less saturated hues, the most striking difference being the lack of the brilliant red shoes. The expressions of the models are also different, the young man in the oil looks sterner, while the girl appears more knowing.

Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January to July 2007

 See related drawings in the collection

Amity
Pencil and Chalk, 16¼" x 18½" (41.5 x 47.0 cm)
The Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool

© All Rights Reserved

This pencil study depicts a different young woman; the focus is less on the model, concentrating on the drapery of the young woman's dress.

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Family at Polperro
1934-36
Oil on Canvas, 50¼" x 40" (127.6 x 101.9 cm)
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
 

The Family at Polperro, 1934-6

© All Rights Reserved

The same strong design is evident again here in another of Fleetwood‐Walker's large canvases from the 1930s, but unlike Amity or The Family, 1932, the colours are cool and more muted. The artist appears again with his family on a day out in the country, this time at the beach in the Cornish town of Polperro. The group are close both physically and emotionally; it is a satisfied and satisfying picture.

The painting was presented to the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery by the artist in 1939 in memory of his first wife.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1936, no. 154
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 82
Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January 7th to July 7th 2007
Exhibited Birmingham Museum in The Art of Birmingham 1890-1939, October 2007 to February 2008

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Elizabeth
1936
Watercolour
Dudley Museum & Art Gallery

Elizabeth
© All Rights Reserved

A very quiet and gentle watercolour described by the Birmingham Mail in their review of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Spring Exhibition 1936 as having a 'haunting loveliness' that the artist 'achieves with his small quick work'.

The Hat
1934-6
Pencil and crayon
Royal Birmingham Society of Artists

The Hat
© All Rights Reserved

The drawing of 'Mickey' the artist's first wife is one of a number of studies for the finished oil Family at Polperro. Many similar works were drawn on this thin, smooth surfaced paper that allowed for the working of fine detail.
 
See related drawings in the collection
 

Both exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists in Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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Three Boys
1937
Oil on Canvas, 29½" x 36¼" (75.0 x 92.0 cm)
Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (1937-0010-1)
 

Three Boys, 1937
© All Rights Reserved

This group portrait, Three Boys, was a gift to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa from The New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts in 1937.

Laurie Benson, Curator, International Art, at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne has described the painting thus:

"... Rather than deeply exploring the psyche of his sitters, [Fleetwood‐Walker] was more adept at articulating their emotional and romantic sentiments. His work continues the British tradition of intimism and his strongest works are group studies in which he perceptively captured the sense of relationships through subtle facial expressions, gesture and, most importantly, touch. Among masterworks are portraits of his family, notably of his children, of which 'Three Boys' is an outstanding example. His two sons, Colin in the centre and Guy on the right are joined by a friend, and the loving gesture of the elder brother's arm around his sibling personifies Fleetwood‐Walker's ability to show deeply felt emotion in an understated way."

The boy posing with Colin and Guy is their childhood friend Harvey Gray.

Exhibited NGV International (National Gallery of Victoria), Melbourne, Australia in
Modern Britain 1900-1960: Master Works from Australian and New Zealand Collections,
November 2007 to February 2008
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John Ball and the Peasants' Rising of 1381
1938
Mural, 14' x 14' (427.0 x 427.0 cm)
County Hall, Chelmsford, Essex County Council
 

John Ball and the Peasants' Rising of 1381, 1938
© All Rights Reserved
The painting depicts a well-known historical figure from the County of Essex ‐ John Ball whose criticisms of the feudal system lead to his being removed from his post as the priest of St James' Church in Colchester. As a traveling priest and barred from preaching in local churches, John Ball continued his crusade on the local village greens. Following imprisonment in Maidstone he was rescued by Wat Tyler and his rebel army of peasants, 30,000 of whom marched on London, and afterwards suffered at the hands of the King's army. John Ball was finally captured in Coventry, and found guilty of high treason was hung, drawn and quartered on 15th July, 1381.

Fleetwood‐Walker has chosen to show John Ball at a peaceful time, before the bloody battle, preaching to a captivated audience of men and women, young and old. The scene is idyllic, the sun shining on the up-turned faces of his audience who appear to show no animosity to the wealthier members of the crowd, such as the man in green on horseback or the man dressed in fur edged robes in conversation with a monk. Ball himself, however, looks somewhat haggard and ashen faced, perhaps anticipating his fate.  The mural measures 14' x 14' and is in the Council Chamber Foyer at County Hall in Chelmsford.

Arrangements can be made to see the mural ‐ contact Essex County Council. heritage.conservation@essex.gov.uk


Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1938, number 752 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal

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Trug with Dog Daisies
1930s
Oil on Canvas, 14" x 17" (37.5 x 44.8 cm)
Wolverhampton Art Gallery
 
Trug with Dog Daisies
© All Rights Reserved

 

Still Life with Pyrethrums
1930s
Oil on Board, 13" x 15" (33.4 x 39.5 cm)
Wolverhampton Art Gallery
 

Still Life with Pyrethrums

© All Rights Reserved

 

Baskets and trugs containing flowers or fruit are a recurring motif in Fleetwood‐Walker's paintings. Variations on this theme can be seen in Amity, The Family, 1932 and Peggy and Jean.

Both Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January to July 2007

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Joan
1930s
Oil on Canvas, 20½" x 24¼" (52.1 x 61.7 cm)
Birmingham Institute of Art & Design (Birmingham City University)
 
Joan
© All Rights Reserved

This powerful portrait of a young woman is composed of strong lines and bold areas of colour, with the sitter in a relaxed and recumbent pose and brought forward almost into the arms of the viewer. It has a formal quality to it typical of works prior to the artist's move towards the looser brushstrokes characteristic of his later portraiture.

Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January to July 2007

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Auntie
1946
Oil on Canvas, 29½" x 24½" (74.9 x 62.2 cm)
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK
 

Auntie, 1946

'Elderly aunts' were a feature of life in the Fleetwood‐Walker household, for Colin and Guy at least, but whilst this painting always remained a family favourite, the sitter is unidentified. One idea might be that the old lady was a pianist or piano teacher - her hands form a central part of the composition and there is a piano behind her in the background. Fleetwood‐Walker's first wife Majorie (Mickey) was also a pianist.

The armchair, like other motifs, appears in many drawings and paintings, for example, the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists's watercolour of Joan Woollard, Still Life and, indeed, in its own portrait entitled simply The Armchair.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1946, number 170.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 112
In the collection of The Royal Academy of Arts purchased by the RA Stott Fund in 1946.


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© All Rights Reserved

Children
1947
Oil on Canvas, 30" x 25" (76.2 x 63.5 cm)
Dudley Museum & Art Gallery
 

Children, 1947
© All Rights Reserved

Fleetwood‐Walker was well known for his paintings of children, although by this date most appear to be individual portraits. Despite the fact that there are numerous studies in the drawings collection for the different children making up this group, in particular the boy with the apple, the painting seems to be curiously unfinished and does not display the definition evident in the two other group portraits of 1941 and 1942, respectively Children from the Town and Children in the Country. None of the children are known, but Fleetwood‐Walker frequently painted local children or those of friends, and neighbours.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1947, no. 50
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 121
Exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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In the Dordogne
1947
Oil on panel, 20" x 16" (50.8 x 40.6 cm)
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK
 

In the Dordogne

While Fleetwood‐Walker was known as a portrait painter, many drawings and a number of oils exist of landscapes. Some of these are of farms and villages, acting as studies for the backgrounds of other works as for example that seen in The Family 1932. Later paintings such as this loose tree study is similar to Hillside near Caranac and Woodland Scene possibly painted in the late 1940s on sketching tours in France.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1959, number 27
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no.125
Purchased by the RA 1959 (Harrison Weir Fund), copyright assigned to the RA 25th July 1959


 

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© Royal Academy of Arts, London

 
Miss Bryan
1949
Oil on canvas, 17" x 12" (43.2 x 30.5 cm)
Museums Sheffield
 

Miss Bryan

© All Rights Reserved

Head of a Girl
Unknown
Oil on board, 13½" x 9½" (34.4 x 24.4 cm)
Museums Sheffield
 

Head of a Girl

© All Rights Reserved

These two works are in the collection of Museums Sheffield and were probably produced in the same period.  They are similar in style to many other paintings of female heads; compare the fresh faces and animated eyes with the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists's portrait of Caroline or the broad brush stokes and areas of bold colour in the painting of Louise in Dudley's collection.

Both paintings are unfinished; they may have been abandoned commissions or else samples of the many quick oil sketches carried out during a teaching sitting.

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Seated Boy
1940s
Pencil
Wolverhampton Art Gallery
 

Seated Boy
© All Rights Reserved

Fleetwood‐Walker was well known for his studies and portraits of children, many of whom were the children of friends and neighbours. The drawings collection has a number of similar pencil studies of a young seated boy, some of which may relate to this more finished work, in particular see drawing number 653

While the sitter has not been identified, it is similar in pose and mood to the finished oil painting of 1944, originally called 'Boy' and submitted to the Royal Academy in 1956 by Fleetwood‐Walker as his Diploma work with the title 'Peter' [click here]

Exhibited Wolverhampton Art Gallery, January to July 2007

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Nude
1940s
Pencil
Royal Birmingham Society of Artists
 

Nude

© All Rights Reserved

 

Nude
1940s
Pencil
Royal Birmingham Society of Artists
 
Nude
© All Rights Reserved
 

These two drawings are typical of the numerous figure studies evident in the drawings collection and which formed the basis of traditional fine art teaching and the acquisition of drawing skills. They may have been executed during a life class at the Birmingham School of Art & Crafts.

Both exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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Joan Woollard
c.1950
Watercolour
Royal Birmingham Society of Artists
 

Joan Woollard

© All Rights Reserved

This watercolour is typical of the rapid sketches that Fleetwood‐Walker made to explore the harmony between a particular pose and the elements that make it. The concern here is not so much with the detail of the line, but with the colours and their relationships.

The work appears to be on the same paper as a watercolour sketch of Joan in the collection and may have been executed during the same sitting ( see related image 386). Both studies could relate to the finished work Joan

Joan Woollard became the first female President of the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists.

Exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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Douglas Gresham Esq.
1950
Oil on Canvas, 36" x 28" (91.4 x 71.1 cm)
Dudley Museum & Art Gallery
 

Douglas Gresham Esq.
© All Rights Reserved

Fleetwood‐Walker undertook numerous commissions especially during the 1940s and 1950s of local businessmen and politicians. This portrait has been described as being a particularly sensitive portrayal of Douglas Gresham and yet remained in the artist's studio and was subsequently purchased by Dudley Museum & Art Gallery from the Memorial Exhibition held at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists in 1966.

In the drawings collection there is a pencil study showing the sitter at a slightly different angle, together with a quick compositional sketch ( see related drawing 122).


Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1951, number 149 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 137
Exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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Dr. Edward Bramley
1950
Oil on Canvas, 43¼" x 33½" (110.0 x 85.0 cm)
University of Sheffield
 

Dr. Edward Bramley, 1950
© All Rights Reserved

As a local solicitor and secretary to the Sheffield Law Society, Edward Bramley (1868-1969) was instrumental in establishing training for future attorneys at the University College of Sheffield in 1899. He continued his law career at the University of Sheffield, as Head of Department between 1900-06, as Dean of the Faculty of Law by 1908, Treasurer 1941-6 and Pro-Vice Chancellor 1946-51. His legacy is recognised today through the Edward Bramley scholarships and the student law society that bears his name.

The style of the painting, with the sitter seated in full robes, in ¾ length view and against a painterly background of neutral toned, free brushstrokes is typical of these late portraits of public figures (see also the portrait of Alderman H.B.W. Cresswell).

The painting was donated by the sitter to the University of Sheffield.

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Louise
1951
Oil on Canvas, 14" x 10" (35.6 x 25.4 cm)
Dudley Museum & Art Gallery
 

Louise

© All Rights Reserved

This portrait is typical of the warm palette and loose brushstroke that characterised Fleetwood‐Walker's later works.

Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 142
Caroline
1953
Oil on Canvas, 14" x 10" (35.6 x 25.4 cm)
Royal Birmingham Society of Artists
 

Caroline

© All Rights Reserved

Fleetwood‐Walker excelled in capturing the mood of his sitters and in this bright and lively portrait we can sense the girl's desire to be away from the confines of the studio and back out into the fresh air.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1954 (number 630) and, as 'Wendy' in 1964 (number 488) and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal both years.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 151
 
Both exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

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Thomas Ferrers (1887 - 1970), formerly known as Thomas Walker
1952/3
Oil on canvas, 34" x 39" (86.0 x 99.0 cm)
The National Trust, Baddesley Clinton
 

Thomas Ferrers

The Ferrers family had lived at Baddesley Clinton, a moated manor house in Knowle, Warwickshire, since 1517. In 1940, a distant cousin of the last member of the Ferrers family, Thomas Walker, who later took the Ferrers name, bought the house. Thomas and his wife Undine set about restoring the house and it was their wish to pass the property to The National Trust. Unfortunately, the endowment that accompanied the bequest was insufficient and on Thomas's death, the estate was run by his son Thomas Weaving Ferrers-Walker, for a further ten years until 1980. Two local donors then generously provided an endowment that allowed the estate to be bought by the Government through the National Land Fund, and then be given to the National Trust. In 1982, after two years of restoration work the house was opened to the public.
 
The House and Gardens are open for much of the year and the portrait hangs on the main staircase, leading to the upper landing.

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© All Rights Reserved

 

Lucy
1953
Oil on hardboard, 24" x 20" (61.0 x 50.8 cm)
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK

Lucy

This work was submitted to the Royal Academy in 1961 in exchange for Peter, the painting which had been deposited as a token diploma picture after the Artist's election [to the Royal Academy] in 1956

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1954, number 116 and 1965, number 244 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal in 1965.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 145


 

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© Royal Academy of Arts, London

 

Julie, No. 2
1954
Oil on panel, 19½" x 23½" (49.5 x 59.7 cm)
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK
 

Julie Rushbury Fleetwood‐Walker had trained at the School of Art with the Birmingham born artist Henry Rushbury and they remained friends and colleagues throughout their lives; working together latterly at the Royal Academy of Arts in London where Rushbury had been elected Keeper in 1949 and Head of its schools until his retirement in 1964.

This work, along with another almost identical painting titled Julie no.1 was first exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer exhibition in 1955. Fleetwood‐Walker painted several other portraits of Julie (see all works) as well as Rushbury's elder daughter Janet.
 
Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1955, number 114 and 1962, number 568 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal in 1962.
Purchased by the Royal Academy in 1962 (Stott Fund).
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 153

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© Royal Academy of Arts, London

 

Alderman H.B.W. Cresswell
1954
Oil on Canvas, 50" x 40" (127.0 x 101.6 cm)
The Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry
 

Alderman H.B.W. Cresswell
© All Rights Reserved

Alderman H.B.W. Cresswell was the 1st Lord Mayor of Coventry. Fleetwood‐Walker was often commissioned to produce portraits of dignitaries, some of which can be seen here.

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1954, no. 162 and illustrated in the Royal Academy Journal.

See related drawings in the collection



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Professor Thomas Bodkin
1955
Oil on Canvas
Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery
 

Professor Thomas Bodkin, 1955
© All Rights Reserved

Thomas Bodkin (1887-1961) grew up in Ireland where he studied law and began his love of art under the influence of his uncle, Sir Hugh Lane. He was Director of the National Gallery of Ireland between 1927 and 1935 and wrote a number of art books. He came to Birmingham to take up the appointment as a professor of fine arts at the University and also as the first Director of the newly established Barber Institute where he was charged with acquiring the finest works for the city. He remained at the Barber Institute until 1952.

There are similarities with the slightly earlier portrait of Douglas Gresham for example the sitters' right hands and the same studio chair appears in both works. There is one preliminary study for the finished oil drawn on buff coloured Dixons David Cox Drawing paper (see related drawing 121)

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1956, no. 555.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 154
Exhibited Birmingham Museum in The Art of Birmingham 1890-1939, October 2007 to February 2008

See related drawings in the collection

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Juanita
c. 1958
Oil on panel, 19" x 15¼" (48.3 x 38.7 cm)
Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK
 

Juanita
© Royal Academy of Arts, London
This portrait is typical of the numerous oil studies of children Fleetwood‐Walker painted in the 1940s and 50s down to the clasped hands, possibly holding an apple, and the serious face (see Helen and Kathleen). The painting is particularly decorative ‐ Fleetwood‐Walker described his concern when making a painting "...with the arranging of its parts into an ordered design".

A single small study for the girl's face executed on heavy David Cox paper exists in the drawings collection ( 613)

Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, 1958, number 123
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 157

This press photograph shows the artist holding the painting, either at the time of its exhibition in 1958 or its acquisition by the Royal Academy, which subsequently became the basis of a self-portrait.

Portrait with Juanita

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The Armchair
1960
Oil on Canvas, 29" x 20" (73.7 x 50.8 cm)
Dudley Museum & Art Gallery
 

The Armchair
© All Rights Reserved

This high-backed armchair, and others similar, featured as a studio prop in paintings as early as 1937 and continued to appear regularly in Fleetwood‐Walker's works for example, the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists's watercolour of Joan Woollard, Still Life and in the portrait of Auntie.

Here it becomes, delightfully, a character in its own right; the Yorkshire Post reviewing the RA exhibition in 1960 said that this painting 'demonstrates how much a painter with an eye for design can make of the simplest materials'.

The armchair remains in the family and is still well used!


Exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1960, no. 90. and 1965, no. 45.
Exhibited Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Memorial Exhibition, 1966, no. 162
Exhibited at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists in Portraits in Birmingham, May to June 2007

Drawing of Armchair        

This drawing of a similar composition appears in the drawings collection ( 622)
 
 

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Study of the head of a woman with short hair - Christine
c.1961
Oil on Hardboard, 16½" x 12¼" (41.7 x 31.2 cm)
McLean Museum & Art Gallery, Inverclyde
 

Christine
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This portrait of a young woman is typical of the loose brushstrokes of Fleetwood‐Walker's later work. The effects of light and shadow are strong and the blue tones unusual. Labels on the reverse of the work indicate he painted it once he had left Birmingham and was living at 13 Walgrave Road, London SW5. The painting was acquired by the Inverclyde Museum in 1961.

Either this painting or other entitled Christine (ref. 298 in All Known Works) exhibited Royal Academy Summer Exhibition 1960, no. 724.

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Cataloguing and content by Nicola Walker, nicola.walker@Fleetwood‐Walker.co.uk
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